Public Works & Utilities.

Public Works & Utilities.

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Welcome.

The Public Works & Utilities Department consists of a variety of different divisions with a common goal of providing vital city services to citizens of Elkhart. These divisions operate and maintain the City’s stormwater conveyance system, drinking water supply and distribution system, wastewater collection system, and wastewater treatment.

Our Mission

  • To serve as a reliable provider of City services
  • To provide these services at a reasonable cost
  • To maintain a customer focus
  • To serve as a steward of our natural resources for future generations
  • To foster professional excellence

574-293-2572

574-264-4273

574-293-7658

public works

Welcome.

The Public Works & Utilities Department consists of a variety of different divisions with a common goal of providing vital city services to citizens of Elkhart. These divisions operate and maintain the City’s stormwater conveyance system, drinking water supply and distribution system, wastewater collection system, and wastewater treatment.

Our Mission

  • To serve as a reliable provider of City services
  • To provide these services at a reasonable cost
  • To maintain a customer focus
  • To serve as a steward of our natural resources for future generations
  • To foster professional excellence

574-293-2572

574-264-4273

574-293-7658

public works

Online
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Aquatic
Biology.

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About

The Aquatics Program is a joint effort between the Cities of Elkhart and South Bend to evaluate the health of the St. Joseph and Elkhart Rivers and their tributaries. The program’s main focus is to evaluate the fish communities of local rivers and streams. However, it also looks at the health of the macroinvertebrate (insects and other small animals) communities, collects water samples, and samples the tissue of certain species to evaluate fish consumption safety. All of the data gathered by the program, biological and chemical, is used in a comprehensive evaluation of the health of our local waterways. Since the inception of the program in 1998, a significant amount of data has been collected on the health of our local rivers and streams.

Reports

2019 Aquatic Monitoring Report
2018 Aquatic Monitoring Report 
2017 Aquatic Monitoring Report 
2016 Aquatic Monitoring Report
2015 Aquatic Monitoring Report 

Why We Monitor

The St. Joseph River is the most important natural resource in the communities of South Bend and Elkhart.  As our communities developed around the river in the 1800s, we used it as a mode of transportation, a source of energy for industry and electricity, and as a conveyance for getting rid of our waste.  Early uses of the river drastically impacted its health, but it has improved significantly.  The Elkhart-South Bend Aquatics Program is gauging the health of the river from a long-term perspective.

Fishing in the St. Joseph River

The Indiana stretch of the St. Joseph River, from Bristol to the downstream side of South Bend, offers excellent fishing opportunities.  There are numerous game species that can be caught, from steelhead and salmon that swim out of Lake Michigan, to a prolific smallmouth bass fishery that draws countless bass anglers and tournaments.  Other heavily pursued fish include walleye, panfish (bluegill and crappie), channel catfish, and more.  While serious anglers continuously fish their hot spots on the St. Joseph River, it also offers a lot of opportunities for those that don’t get to fish often or those that are new to fishing.  People interested in learning more about fishing opportunities on the St. Joseph River should feel free to contact us.

Is it Safe to Eat Fish From our Local Rivers?

It is apparent from talking with local residents that many people don’t have a great understanding of whether or not it is safe to eat locally caught fish.  There is a perception among many that fish are completely unsafe to eat out of the rivers, while others claim that it’s just fine to eat any species without concern.   The truth lies somewhere in between.  It has a lot to do with the species of fish, its size, and where it was caught.  A variety of fish species are safe to eat from our local rivers and streams, as long as they are consumed in moderation and as recommended in the State’s Fish Consumption Advisory.

The State of Indiana, through several agencies, monitors fish contaminant information in water bodies across the state of Indiana in an effort to provide guidance on consuming wild fish.  The St. Joseph River is included in their fish consumption advisory, with a significant amount of the data provided by the Elkhart-South Bend Aquatics Program.  Detailed information on fish consumption in Indiana can be found at the Indiana Department of Health’s website.

Americans with
Disabilities Act.

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In 1990, the Federal Government enacted the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Title II of the ADA required all public organizations with 50 or more employees to adopt a Transition Plan identifying physical obstacles limiting access to programs, services, and activities by persons with qualified disabilities and bring related deficiencies into compliance with the ADA. The City of Elkhart’s elected officials and staff believe everyone has a right to access public rights-of-way, facilities, and programs. The City of Elkhart is committed to making that happen.

The City of Elkhart completed the multi-step process of writing its Transition Plans in 2012.  The Right-of-Way Transition Plan and the Programs, Services, and Facilities Transition Plan are available by clicking on the title. The City will continue to review the Transition Plans as new construction projects in the public right-of-way and any renovations of public facilities are completed.

The City of Elkhart acknowledges its desire and responsibility to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. In order to assist individuals with disabilities who require special accommodations for participation in, or access to, City-sponsored public programs, services, and meetings, a request for accommodation can be made by submitting this form or contacting the ADA Coordinator at (574) 295-2572.

ADA Coordinators and Procedures Resolution

ADA Accessibility Guidelines Resolution

Programs
& Services.

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City of Elkhart Tax Phase-in Program: The City of Elkhart recognizes the value in selective use of a Tax Phase-In. Under Indiana State statute, both personal and real property improvements can receive a tax phase-in of up to 10 years. The length of thephase-in is based upon several factors, including number of jobs created, wage levelsof new jobs and amount of overall investment.

Get the Tax Phase-in Application here (pdf)

Aurora Capital Loan Fund: The Aurora Capital Loan Fund will be used to finance therehabilitation and construction of commercial real estate in Downtown Elkhart. The objective of the loan fund is to stimulate physical improvements to small businessesin Downtown Elkhart.

Get the Aurora Capital Load Fund Application here (pdf)

For more information regarding the Aurora Capital Loan Fund, please contact its loan administrator – Mr. Burl Troyer at burltroyer@icloud.com

Combined
Sewer Overflow.

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Our sewer system, like many in cities throughout the United States, was designed to carry both sewage and rainwater – with relief points that overflow when too much rainwater enters the system.
During dry weather, sewage flows safely through the sewers to our wastewater treatment plant. However, during rainstorms or snowmelt, the incoming stormwater can overwhelm the sewers and cause raw sewage to overflow into the St. Joseph River, Elkhart River, and Christiana Creek.
During wet weather, overflows can occur at up to 29 locations along our waterways and can be triggered by as little as two-tenths of an inch of rainfall or snowmelt.
Elkhart has developed a plan to capture and treat more of these overflows.
Elkhart strives to inform our citizens that caution should be taken when choosing to engage in recreational activity on or in the surface water bodies of our community during and after a rainfall or snowmelt event. The link below provides more information about how the City meets this goal.

Construction
Projects.

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Map Legend
Red_Thumbtack Current or Anticipated City Project
Yellow_Thumbtack Completed City Project
Red_Polygon Current or Anticipated City Project
Blue_Polygon Not City Managed Project; either partially City-funded or no funding from City

The following are current or anticipated construction projects within the City. Please note, not all projects listed are being managed by the City.

2020 Major Engineering Projects
WWTP Expansion
Benham Ave Streetscape
Bristol & Baldwin
River District
John Weaver Parkway
Central Green

2020 Other Engineering Projects
Pine & Poplar Sewer
Albany Sewer & Water
Illinois Sanitary
Davis Sanitary
Stark Sanitary
N. Main St. Water
Cone Street
Jaylan Drive
Sussex Sanitary
Cassopolis Streetscape
Marion St
Sidewalk Projects

Future Engineering Projects
Bristol St Widening
Hively Grade Separation
Lexington Water Main
Benham & McKinley
Cassopolis Wayfinding

Notable Past Projects
NE Water Tower
CSO 4 & 30 Separation
CSO 31 Pump & Storage Facility
CSO 33 Separation
CSO 30 Elimination
CSO 6 & 7 Pump & Storage Facility
CSO 14 Separation
Prairie St Overpass

Drinking
Water.

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All of the City of Elkhart’s drinking water is supplied from groundwater. This groundwater comes from several hundred feet below ground. The water is pumped to the surface, treated, and sent to City water customers.  Three wellfields, the North Main Street Wellfield, the South Wellfield and the Northwest Wellfield provide the water supply for the City of Elkhart.

In 2015, 2.9 billion gallons of safe drinking water was supplied to Elkhart customers through 346 miles of water mains.

Groundwater comes from rain, snow, sleet, and hail that soaks into the ground. The water moves down into the ground passing between particles of soil, sand, gravel, or rock until it reaches a depth where the ground is filled, or saturated, with water called the saturated zone and the top of this zone is called the water table. The water table may be very near the ground’s surface or it may be hundreds of feet below.

Most groundwater is clean, but groundwater can become polluted, or contaminated. It can become polluted from leaky underground tanks, leaky landfills, or when people apply too much fertilizer or pesticides on their fields or lawns. When pollutants leak, spill, or are dumped on the ground they can move through the soil. Groundwater pollution is generally difficult and expensive to clean up.

It is up to each of us to make sure we
have clean and safe water to drink. 

Master Plan

Elkhart has developed a Water Master Plan to identify the necessary capital improvements to ensure adequate water supply, storage, treatment and distribution for the next ten years. For more information on the plan please call (574) 293-2572.

Programs
& Services.

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City of Elkhart Tax Phase-in Program: The City of Elkhart recognizes the value in selective use of a Tax Phase-In. Under Indiana State statute, both personal and real property improvements can receive a tax phase-in of up to 10 years. The length of thephase-in is based upon several factors, including number of jobs created, wage levelsof new jobs and amount of overall investment.

Get the Tax Phase-in Application here (pdf)

Aurora Capital Loan Fund: The Aurora Capital Loan Fund will be used to finance therehabilitation and construction of commercial real estate in Downtown Elkhart. The objective of the loan fund is to stimulate physical improvements to small businessesin Downtown Elkhart.

Get the Aurora Capital Load Fund Application here (pdf)

For more information regarding the Aurora Capital Loan Fund, please contact its loan administrator – Mr. Burl Troyer at burltroyer@icloud.com

Laboratory.

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The staff consists of
  • Chief Chemist
  • Chemist
  • 2 Assistant Chemists
  • Water Quality Assurance Specialist
  • Aquatic Biologist
  • Pretreatment Coordinator
  • 2 Industrial Waste Specialists

Our Water Quality section works with the Operations, Distribution, and Laboratory staff to ensure the delivery of a reliable and safe water supply. The bacteriological testing of new water mains ensures that outside contamination does not enter the water distribution system. Daily analysis of chlorine and fluoride ensure correct chemical doses for optimal effectiveness without using excess treatment chemicals, therefore saving money for our customers. An extensive monitoring program requires sampling and analysis of drinking water throughout the City. The Public Works staff chooses to go beyond the federally mandated frequencies for sampling and analysis. We believe this is another safeguard to protect our customers against potentially harmful contamination.

The Laboratory staff has won the Indiana Water Pollution Control Association’s Laboratory Excellence Award for the 23rd time in twenty-four years of participation. This recognizes the production of excellent, legally defensible data resulting from an outstanding Quality Assurance program that incorporates specialized training, detailed record-keeping, a safe working environment, and detail-oriented staff.

The Laboratory section analyzes over 4,000 samples annually for multiple parameters.  The laboratory’s analysis includes drinking water, wastewater, industrial effluent, groundwater, surface water, swimming pool water, biosolids, and soil samples.

Pretreatment
Program.

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City of Elkhart Industrial Pretreatment Program

Working with local industries and businesses to protect the community and the environment! 

Elkhart’s Industrial Pretreatment Program has earned high honors in the Great Lakes region and nationally. The program earned a US EPA Region V Award of Excellence and the National Second Place Award of Excellence for its class.

In an effort to protect our treatment works and the quality of our rivers and streams, the Pretreatment staff permits inspects and monitors over 45 industries.  In addition, the program facilitates the fats, oil, and grease program.  Together the industries, food service establishments, and staff form a partnership that is dedicated to improving and preserving Elkhart’s environmental resources.

Industrial Pretreatment Program:

The Pretreatment Program administers regulations to make sure the wastewater generated by industries is treated properly. Many industries must pretreat their wastewater before sending it to the sewer. This helps to protect the wastewater treatment system, our employees, the facilities as well as help to ensure that clean, quality water is discharged.  Because of our relationships with local industries and their commitment to protecting the environment, our waterways are cleaner today than in previous decades because business practices have improved.

Fats, Oil, and Grease Program:

In an effort to help protect the City of Elkhart’s sewer infrastructure, reduce blockages and backups, on April 6, 2015, the City of Elkhart’s Council adopted Ordinance No. 5434 to regulate the discharge of fats, oil, and grease (FOG) from food service establishments (FSEs).  This ordinance took effect on June 1, 2015.  The goal of this program is to help protect the City’s sewer infrastructure.  Passage of the ordinance is just one component of the City’s FOG program.  The City recognizes that FSEs are just one part of our customer base that may contribute to the buildup of FOG in the sewers. Other components of the program include the regulation of non-FSE industrial customers and outreach to local residents to reduce their contribution of FOG to the City’s sewer system.

A major component of the FOG Program is the registration of ALL FSE’s connected to the City of Elkhart’s sewer system.  Once registered and an inspection completed, FSE’s will receive a FOG Registration Certificate.  The FOG Registration Certificate will be valid for 3 years from the date of issuance.

On July 2, 2019, Elkhart’s City Council adopted changes to the FOG ordinance.  The changes to the Ordinance were the result of combined input from the Utility and with the local food service establishments.  These changes went into effect immediately will be referred to as Ordinance 5434 as amended.

Additionally, the City of Elkhart’s Board of Public Works approved changes to the FOG policy on July 16, 2019.

Thank you food service establishments for your continued efforts to eliminate fats, oil, and grease in our sewer system.

Dental Mercury:

Dental offices discharge mercury present in amalgam used for fillings. The Pretreatment Program is in the process of developing a dental mercury program.

Programs
& Services.

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City of Elkhart Tax Phase-in Program: The City of Elkhart recognizes the value in selective use of a Tax Phase-In. Under Indiana State statute, both personal and real property improvements can receive a tax phase-in of up to 10 years. The length of thephase-in is based upon several factors, including number of jobs created, wage levelsof new jobs and amount of overall investment.

Get the Tax Phase-in Application here (pdf)

Aurora Capital Loan Fund: The Aurora Capital Loan Fund will be used to finance therehabilitation and construction of commercial real estate in Downtown Elkhart. The objective of the loan fund is to stimulate physical improvements to small businessesin Downtown Elkhart.

Get the Aurora Capital Load Fund Application here (pdf)

For more information regarding the Aurora Capital Loan Fund, please contact its loan administrator – Mr. Burl Troyer at burltroyer@icloud.com

Trash
& Recycling.

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The Public Works and Utilities Department and the Street Department facilitate the collection of garbage and recycling efforts within the City of Elkhart.  Recycling carts and trash carts are distributed by Borden Waste-Away. They can be reached at 574-293-5001. Small recycling bins are distributed at the City Street Department located at 2421 S. 17th St.  They can be reached at 574-293-5518.

Curbside Recycling

Doing your part to recycle will help keep trash collection costs down and save room at our landfill. Once a week, on the same day as your trash collection, Borden Waste-Away also collects recyclables. As of January 1st, you have your choice or recycling container, two 18 gallon bins, a 48-gallon cart, or a 96-gallon cart. To obtain the 18-gallon bins please contact the Elkhart Street Department. Their telephone number is 293-5518 and their hours of operation are Monday through Friday 8 am to 4 pm. To obtain a 48 or 96-gallon cart please contact Borden. You may go to their website at www.wasteawaygroup.com and click Elkhart City Recycling Program. You may also call Borden (574) 293-5001, Monday – Friday 7 am – 5:30 pm & Saturday 8 am – 12 pm.
What Can You Recycle?
Glass Bottles and Jars
Clear, brown, or green glass bottles or jars (but not Pyrex, light bulbs, plate glass, drinking glasses, ceramics, auto glass, tempered glass, or mirrors)
1. Remove all lids and rinse
2. Labels and rings can be left on
3. Do not break
Metal
Clean aluminum, tin, and steel cans.  Please rinse before recycling.  Please do not include cans that have contained pesticides, herbicides, or paint. (Labels may be left on.)
Paper
Newspapers, magazines and catalogs, inserts, office, and copy paper, junk mail, paper bags, telephone books, computer paper, and other papers. Corrugated cardboard and paperboard boxes such as cereal boxes, shoe boxes, or beverage cartons. (Please keep any contaminated paper, soiled napkins, or carbon paper out of the recycling bin.)
 
Plastic’s # 1 thru 7
Examples include rinsed soft drink and water bottles, yogurt containers, milk jugs, detergent bottles, or frozen food containers. Please no expanded polystyrene, such as packing peanuts or popcorn.

Recycling numbers

A few things to keep in mind…
  1. Please only put the bin out on the same day as your regular trash pickup.
  2. If your collection day falls on a holiday, your waste and your recyclables will be picked up on the following day.
  3. Always, have your recyclables on your curbside by 6:00 am.
  4. When you move, leave the recycling bin for the next homeowner.

For more information please check out our City of Elkhart Recycling Brochure.

The 3 Rs?  Reduce, Reuse and Recycle
Every day we as consumers choose which items purchase items and how we dispose of our waste.  Remembering 3 R’s can help us be green buyers and ultimately help protect the earth for future generations.
Reduce
First, reduce the waste being generated.  Some ideas include purchasing and using durable instead of disposal items (such as dishes, shopping bags, shaving razors, etc). When purchasing items, look for minimum packaging and if it will generate waste after it is used, look for items that can be recycled. When items are reduced, no new resources are expended.
Reuse
Second, reuse the waste being generated. When one no longer needs an item but it still has a useful life, that item can be reused either in the manner in which it was initially intended or in a new way. For ideas on how to reuse, check out Keep Indianapolis Beautiful’s Reuse and Recycling Guide.
Recycle
Third, recycle the waste being generated. Recycling takes items no longer needed or useful and turns it into raw material for new product manufacturing. Glass, paper, plastic, and some metals can be turned into new products that contain recycled content, saving energy in the manufacturing, reducing pollution associated with the mining and extraction of raw materials, and conserving a natural resource.

Trash Pick-Up

Trash pick-up is provided by the City utilizing a one 96-gallon cart and is serviced weekly. For more information see below.

Proper placement of cart and pick-up.

  • On the day of service, carts must be out by 6:00 AM.  The holiday pick-up schedule is one day later than the regular schedule.
  • Cart placement must be within 3 feet of the curb or street side (front of the curb or behind the curb is acceptable).  The placement must be unobstructed, with 2 feet of clearance from objects such as parked cars, trees, poles, etc.
  • Alley pickup is no longer available.
  • Large item pickup – Residents must contact Borden Waste-Away at (574) 293-5001 to arrange for large-item pickup. Included: Furniture, carpet rolls, and large appliances. Not Included: Tires, electronics, construction material, or car parts.

-Residents may dispose of 2 large household items per month
-Residents may dispose of 1 item containing Freon per month
-Pickup for large items is done on the resident’s normal route day with at least 24-hour notice.

What to do when additional service is needed beyond the capacity of the 96-gallon cart:

  • Additional carts are available through Borden.
  • Bag and container tags are available at area Martin’s Supermarkets and the office of Borden Waste-Away.
  • Container tags can be used for any approved residential trash can, waste cart, and for Christmas tree disposal.
  • Bag tags can be used for any household trash bag.
  • For other additional service needs, residents are to call Borden Waste-Away at 293-5001.

To view a map of the Residential Trash Pick-Up Boundaries**

**This trash and recycling service schedule does not apply to non-residential entities, residential dwellings over 4 units, or mobile home communities. There may be additional exceptions.  Please contact Borden at (574) 293-5001 if you have any questions about which day your trash and recycling is scheduled to be serviced.

VIEW MAP


Household Hazardous Waste

Leftover household products that contain corrosive, toxic, or reactive ingredients are considered to be “household hazardous waste” (HHW). HHW includes products such as paints, cleaners, oils, batteries, unused or expired medications, pesticides, or other items that contain potentially hazardous ingredients. These products are safe to use when you follow the manufacturer’s instructions, but they require special handling when you are ready to dispose of them. If disposed of improperly, these wastes can pollute the environment and they can pose a threat to human health. HHW should not be poured down the drain, on the ground, or into storm sewers.

What to Do With HHW
Any household hazardous waste should be saved and brought to one of the monthly Household Hazardous Waste Drop-off Days sponsored by the Elkhart County Solid Waste Management District (all Elkhart County residents are welcomed to drop off waste).  HHW Drop-off Days are held on the first Saturdays of every month from 8am to 3pm at the Elkhart County Correctional Facility on County Road 7 just north of County Road 26. For more information about HHW Drop-off Days please call the Solid Waste Management District at (574) 522-2581.

Items accepted at the monthly HHW Drop-off Days:

  • Floor care products, furniture polish, metal polish
  • Nail polish and polish remover
  • Antifreeze, brake fluid, gasoline, kerosene, transmission fluid, windshield washer fluid, used motor oil
  • Glue, mineral spirits, oil based paint, aerosol paints, paint thinner, paint stripper, rust remover, varnish, wood preservative
  • Fungicide, insecticide, weed killer, rat/mouse poison
  • Household cleaners, gun cleaning solvent, moth balls, lighter fluid, swimming pool chemicals
  • Unused or expired medications (you may also drop off any sharps but they must be in a puncture proof container)
  • Mercury (see link for more information about mercury and our environment)
  • Compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFL’s)
  • Rechargeable batteries, lithium batteries, car batteries (SWMD will take car batteries but these may also be sold to a local scrap dealer)

Items NOT accepted at the monthly HHW Drop-off Days:

Batteries: 
Alkaline batteries can be disposed of in the trash.

Electronic Waste: 
Borden will be hosting a quarterly electronics drop off for all City residents located at 605 Mason St. starting in 2019. The dates of the drop off events will be:

March 25th, 2019
June 27th, 2019
Sept. 26th, 2019
Dec. 19th, 2019

Other options for disposal of electronics :
Best Buy
Borden’s Waste Away
Computer Recycling, Inc (no TV’s)
Goodwill (computers only)
Omni Source (574) 295-4657
Staples

Latex Paint:
Absorb paint with shredded newspaper, kitty litter, sand, sawdust, or other absorbents, and dispose of in your trash. Aerosol cans can be emptied of their contents and disposed of in the trash. Oil-based paint may be taken to the HHW drop-off.

Medications:
Medications may be dropped off at any Elkhart County police station lobby 365 days a year. You may also drop off any sharps (needles, syringes, scalpels, etc.) during an HHW Drop-off Day but they must be in a puncture-proof container.  Please DO NOT dispose of medications in any form in the trash or down the drain!

Microwaves:
Omnisource (574) 295-4657
Sam Winers & Co (574) 293-9031
Schupan & Sons (574) 524-2100

Refrigerators & Freezers:
I & M (call 800-253-5661 for pick up)
Omnisource (574) 295-4657

Tires:
Return to a store that sells tires.

Styrofoam:

Quarterly drop-off available at Recycling Works for City Residents located at 605 Mason Street in Elkhart
Dates: March 25th, 2019
June 27th, 2019
Sept. 26th, 2019
Dec. 19th, 2019


Stormwater.

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What is Stormwater?
Stormwater is water from snow and ice melting, as well as rainwater from storms. When stormwater lands on natural surfaces like forests and grassy areas, most of it soaks into the ground. When it lands on streets, parking lots, and other hard surfaces, it usually runs off to another location.

What is Stormwater Pollution?
As stormwater flows (or snow melts), it picks up debris, chemicals (such as fertilizers and pesticides), dirt, cigarette butts, and other pollutants. This “contaminated” water then enters a storm sewer system and is eventually discharged to a lake, stream, river, wetland, or pond.

Why is Stormwater Pollution a concern?
Within Elkhart stormwater may run off of driveways, parking lots, construction sites, and streets where it picks up oil, grease, sediments, and many other pollutants that are harmful to the environment. As this stormwater washes down our streets it flows into storm drains and then directly into local ponds, creeks, and rivers. When this stormwater flow becomes polluted with eroded soils, automotive fluids, trash, and lawn chemicals, it affects our ability to use our water bodies for drinking, fishing, and recreational purposes. It also degrades aquatic habitats that are essential for waterfowl, fish, and other aquatic organisms. The only way to decrease this polluted stormwater runoff is to reduce the number of pollutants in our urban environment.

Why does Elkhart need a Stormwater Utility?
The City of Elkhart has many natural waterways that wind through the community. Walking/jogging paths and numerous city parks are adjacent to these waterways and provide recreational opportunities for anglers, kayakers, and canoeists. Discharges from various facilities located along the banks of these waterways have been disconnected or cleaned up over the years in an effort to keep unwanted pollution from finding its way into these flowing waters. These efforts have improved the water quality in these waterways but there is still one common way for pollution to get carried into our rivers and streams: through stormwater runoff. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) now considers pollution contained in stormwater runoff to be one of the most significant sources of contamination in our nation’s waterways. To help reduce stormwater pollution, in 1990 EPA established rules to ensure that larger cities create programs, policies and rules at the local level to minimize stormwater pollution. In the late 1990s, these EPA stormwater rules were applied nationwide to municipalities like ours and other densely populated areas.

Who Manages the Stormwater?
The City of Elkhart’s Stormwater Utility was created in 2006 and has responsibility for operating, maintaining, and improving an extensive system of open waterways and enclosed storm sewer pipes. This system contains more than 80 miles of sewer pipes, ditches, and open channels that drain more than 24 square miles. This system exists to collect the stormwater that runs off yards, roofs, streets, and parking lots and carry it away from neighborhoods to local waterways or retention ponds.

The Utility must also ensure that Elkhart meets state and federal requirements for improving the quality of stormwater runoff. Because most stormwater receives no treatment before it goes into a stream, lake, or river it is important that we keep as many pollutants as possible out of the stormwater runoff.

How is Stormwater Management Paid For?
The services of the Stormwater Utility are paid for by a semi-annual fee added to property tax bills. All residential parcels pay $15.00 per year to support the system and non-residential parcels pay $15.00 per 3,600 square feet of impervious land (land with a hard surface that won’t absorb stormwater such as driveways, rooftops, and sidewalks). The City’s authority for collecting this fee is found in Ordinances 5012 (2/9/2007), 5246 (1/28/2011), and 5319 (11/26/2012).


Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP)
Disturbance of 1-acre or more of non-agricultural land requires the property owner to develop a SWPPP and permit the land-disturbing activities. Guidance and forms associated with Elkhart County Soil and Water Conservation District’s (SWCD) plan review process can be found on the Elkhart County Stormwater Partnership’s website or by clicking here.

Wastewater.

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The Elkhart Wastewater Treatment Plant is located at 1201 South Nappanee Street in Elkhart, Indiana and discharges effluent to the St. Joseph River under the authority of the Indiana Department of Environmental Management through the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) with permit #IN0025674.
The facility utilizes the conventional activated sludge process and is designed to treat an average daily flow of 20 MGD with a peak flow capacity of 40 MGD. Preliminary treatment includes automatic bar screens and cyclone grit removal, primary treatment includes eight rectangular clarifiers, and secondary treatment includes five aeration tanks, utilizing a biological nutrient removal process for ammonia and phosphorus. Effluent from the facility is disinfected year-round with ultraviolet light.
Sludge produced as a part of treating the wastewater is processed utilizing anaerobic treatment,  to reduce solids and achieve pathogen reduction. Class A biosolids are dewatered using two-meter belt filter presses and are either given away under an IDEM issued Marketing & Distribution permit, INLA 000680, or processed at a composting facility on County Road 26.

Public
Outreach.

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City of Elkhart Tax Phase-in Program: The City of Elkhart recognizes the value in selective use of a Tax Phase-In. Under Indiana State statute, both personal and real property improvements can receive a tax phase-in of up to 10 years. The length of thephase-in is based upon several factors, including number of jobs created, wage levelsof new jobs and amount of overall investment.

Get the Tax Phase-in Application here (pdf)

Aurora Capital Loan Fund: The Aurora Capital Loan Fund will be used to finance therehabilitation and construction of commercial real estate in Downtown Elkhart. The objective of the loan fund is to stimulate physical improvements to small businessesin Downtown Elkhart.

Get the Aurora Capital Load Fund Application here (pdf)

For more information regarding the Aurora Capital Loan Fund, please contact its loan administrator – Mr. Burl Troyer at burltroyer@icloud.com

Aquatic
Biology.

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.

About

The Aquatics Program is a joint effort between the Cities of Elkhart and South Bend to evaluate the health of the St. Joseph and Elkhart Rivers and their tributaries. The program’s main focus is to evaluate the fish communities of local rivers and streams. However, it also looks at the health of the macroinvertebrate (insects and other small animals) communities, collects water samples, and samples the tissue of certain species to evaluate fish consumption safety. All of the data gathered by the program, biological and chemical, is used in a comprehensive evaluation of the health of our local waterways. Since the inception of the program in 1998, a significant amount of data has been collected on the health of our local rivers and streams.

Reports

2019 Aquatic Monitoring Report
2018 Aquatic Monitoring Report 
2017 Aquatic Monitoring Report 
2016 Aquatic Monitoring Report
2015 Aquatic Monitoring Report 

Why We Monitor

The St. Joseph River is the most important natural resource in the communities of South Bend and Elkhart.  As our communities developed around the river in the 1800s, we used it as a mode of transportation, a source of energy for industry and electricity, and as a conveyance for getting rid of our waste.  Early uses of the river drastically impacted its health, but it has improved significantly.  The Elkhart-South Bend Aquatics Program is gauging the health of the river from a long-term perspective.

Fishing in the St. Joseph River

The Indiana stretch of the St. Joseph River, from Bristol to the downstream side of South Bend, offers excellent fishing opportunities.  There are numerous game species that can be caught, from steelhead and salmon that swim out of Lake Michigan, to a prolific smallmouth bass fishery that draws countless bass anglers and tournaments.  Other heavily pursued fish include walleye, panfish (bluegill and crappie), channel catfish, and more.  While serious anglers continuously fish their hot spots on the St. Joseph River, it also offers a lot of opportunities for those that don’t get to fish often or those that are new to fishing.  People interested in learning more about fishing opportunities on the St. Joseph River should feel free to contact us.

Is it Safe to Eat Fish From our Local Rivers?

It is apparent from talking with local residents that many people don’t have a great understanding of whether or not it is safe to eat locally caught fish.  There is a perception among many that fish are completely unsafe to eat out of the rivers, while others claim that it’s just fine to eat any species without concern.   The truth lies somewhere in between.  It has a lot to do with the species of fish, its size, and where it was caught.  A variety of fish species are safe to eat from our local rivers and streams, as long as they are consumed in moderation and as recommended in the State’s Fish Consumption Advisory.

The State of Indiana, through several agencies, monitors fish contaminant information in water bodies across the state of Indiana in an effort to provide guidance on consuming wild fish.  The St. Joseph River is included in their fish consumption advisory, with a significant amount of the data provided by the Elkhart-South Bend Aquatics Program.  Detailed information on fish consumption in Indiana can be found at the Indiana Department of Health’s website.

Americans with
Disabilities Act.

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In 1990, the Federal Government enacted the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Title II of the ADA required all public organizations with 50 or more employees to adopt a Transition Plan identifying physical obstacles limiting access to programs, services, and activities by persons with qualified disabilities and bring related deficiencies into compliance with the ADA. The City of Elkhart’s elected officials and staff believe everyone has a right to access public rights-of-way, facilities, and programs. The City of Elkhart is committed to making that happen.

The City of Elkhart completed the multi-step process of writing its Transition Plans in 2012.  The Right-of-Way Transition Plan and the Programs, Services, and Facilities Transition Plan are available by clicking on the title. The City will continue to review the Transition Plans as new construction projects in the public right-of-way and any renovations of public facilities are completed.

The City of Elkhart acknowledges its desire and responsibility to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. In order to assist individuals with disabilities who require special accommodations for participation in, or access to, City-sponsored public programs, services, and meetings, a request for accommodation can be made by submitting this form or contacting the ADA Coordinator at (574) 295-2572.

ADA Coordinators and Procedures Resolution

ADA Accessibility Guidelines Resolution

Programs
& Services.

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.

City of Elkhart Tax Phase-in Program: The City of Elkhart recognizes the value in selective use of a Tax Phase-In. Under Indiana State statute, both personal and real property improvements can receive a tax phase-in of up to 10 years. The length of thephase-in is based upon several factors, including number of jobs created, wage levelsof new jobs and amount of overall investment.

Get the Tax Phase-in Application here (pdf)

Aurora Capital Loan Fund: The Aurora Capital Loan Fund will be used to finance therehabilitation and construction of commercial real estate in Downtown Elkhart. The objective of the loan fund is to stimulate physical improvements to small businessesin Downtown Elkhart.

Get the Aurora Capital Load Fund Application here (pdf)

For more information regarding the Aurora Capital Loan Fund, please contact its loan administrator – Mr. Burl Troyer at burltroyer@icloud.com

Combined
Sewer Overflow.

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Our sewer system, like many in cities throughout the United States, was designed to carry both sewage and rainwater – with relief points that overflow when too much rainwater enters the system.
During dry weather, sewage flows safely through the sewers to our wastewater treatment plant. However, during rainstorms or snowmelt, the incoming stormwater can overwhelm the sewers and cause raw sewage to overflow into the St. Joseph River, Elkhart River, and Christiana Creek.
During wet weather, overflows can occur at up to 29 locations along our waterways and can be triggered by as little as two-tenths of an inch of rainfall or snowmelt.
Elkhart has developed a plan to capture and treat more of these overflows.
Elkhart strives to inform our citizens that caution should be taken when choosing to engage in recreational activity on or in the surface water bodies of our community during and after a rainfall or snowmelt event. The link below provides more information about how the City meets this goal.

Construction
Projects.

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.

Map Legend
Red_Thumbtack Current or Anticipated City Project
Yellow_Thumbtack Completed City Project
Red_Polygon Current or Anticipated City Project
Blue_Polygon Not City Managed Project; either partially City-funded or no funding from City

The following are current or anticipated construction projects within the City. Please note, not all projects listed are being managed by the City.

2020 Major Engineering Projects
WWTP Expansion
Benham Ave Streetscape
Bristol & Baldwin
River District
John Weaver Parkway
Central Green

2020 Other Engineering Projects
Pine & Poplar Sewer
Albany Sewer & Water
Illinois Sanitary
Davis Sanitary
Stark Sanitary
N. Main St. Water
Cone Street
Jaylan Drive
Sussex Sanitary
Cassopolis Streetscape
Marion St
Sidewalk Projects

Future Engineering Projects
Bristol St Widening
Hively Grade Separation
Lexington Water Main
Benham & McKinley
Cassopolis Wayfinding

Notable Past Projects
NE Water Tower
CSO 4 & 30 Separation
CSO 31 Pump & Storage Facility
CSO 33 Separation
CSO 30 Elimination
CSO 6 & 7 Pump & Storage Facility
CSO 14 Separation
Prairie St Overpass

Drinking
Water.

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All of the City of Elkhart’s drinking water is supplied from groundwater. This groundwater comes from several hundred feet below ground. The water is pumped to the surface, treated, and sent to City water customers.  Three wellfields, the North Main Street Wellfield, the South Wellfield and the Northwest Wellfield provide the water supply for the City of Elkhart.

In 2015, 2.9 billion gallons of safe drinking water was supplied to Elkhart customers through 346 miles of water mains.

Groundwater comes from rain, snow, sleet, and hail that soaks into the ground. The water moves down into the ground passing between particles of soil, sand, gravel, or rock until it reaches a depth where the ground is filled, or saturated, with water called the saturated zone and the top of this zone is called the water table. The water table may be very near the ground’s surface or it may be hundreds of feet below.

Most groundwater is clean, but groundwater can become polluted, or contaminated. It can become polluted from leaky underground tanks, leaky landfills, or when people apply too much fertilizer or pesticides on their fields or lawns. When pollutants leak, spill, or are dumped on the ground they can move through the soil. Groundwater pollution is generally difficult and expensive to clean up.

It is up to each of us to make sure we
have clean and safe water to drink. 

Master Plan

Elkhart has developed a Water Master Plan to identify the necessary capital improvements to ensure adequate water supply, storage, treatment and distribution for the next ten years. For more information on the plan please call (574) 293-2572.

Programs
& Services.

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.

City of Elkhart Tax Phase-in Program: The City of Elkhart recognizes the value in selective use of a Tax Phase-In. Under Indiana State statute, both personal and real property improvements can receive a tax phase-in of up to 10 years. The length of thephase-in is based upon several factors, including number of jobs created, wage levelsof new jobs and amount of overall investment.

Get the Tax Phase-in Application here (pdf)

Aurora Capital Loan Fund: The Aurora Capital Loan Fund will be used to finance therehabilitation and construction of commercial real estate in Downtown Elkhart. The objective of the loan fund is to stimulate physical improvements to small businessesin Downtown Elkhart.

Get the Aurora Capital Load Fund Application here (pdf)

For more information regarding the Aurora Capital Loan Fund, please contact its loan administrator – Mr. Burl Troyer at burltroyer@icloud.com

Laboratory.

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The staff consists of
  • Chief Chemist
  • Chemist
  • 2 Assistant Chemists
  • Water Quality Assurance Specialist
  • Aquatic Biologist
  • Pretreatment Coordinator
  • 2 Industrial Waste Specialists

Our Water Quality section works with the Operations, Distribution, and Laboratory staff to ensure the delivery of a reliable and safe water supply. The bacteriological testing of new water mains ensures that outside contamination does not enter the water distribution system. Daily analysis of chlorine and fluoride ensure correct chemical doses for optimal effectiveness without using excess treatment chemicals, therefore saving money for our customers. An extensive monitoring program requires sampling and analysis of drinking water throughout the City. The Public Works staff chooses to go beyond the federally mandated frequencies for sampling and analysis. We believe this is another safeguard to protect our customers against potentially harmful contamination.

The Laboratory staff has won the Indiana Water Pollution Control Association’s Laboratory Excellence Award for the 23rd time in twenty-four years of participation. This recognizes the production of excellent, legally defensible data resulting from an outstanding Quality Assurance program that incorporates specialized training, detailed record-keeping, a safe working environment, and detail-oriented staff.

The Laboratory section analyzes over 4,000 samples annually for multiple parameters.  The laboratory’s analysis includes drinking water, wastewater, industrial effluent, groundwater, surface water, swimming pool water, biosolids, and soil samples.

Pretreatment
Program.

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City of Elkhart Industrial Pretreatment Program

Working with local industries and businesses to protect the community and the environment! 

Elkhart’s Industrial Pretreatment Program has earned high honors in the Great Lakes region and nationally. The program earned a US EPA Region V Award of Excellence and the National Second Place Award of Excellence for its class.

In an effort to protect our treatment works and the quality of our rivers and streams, the Pretreatment staff permits inspects and monitors over 45 industries.  In addition, the program facilitates the fats, oil, and grease program.  Together the industries, food service establishments, and staff form a partnership that is dedicated to improving and preserving Elkhart’s environmental resources.

Industrial Pretreatment Program:

The Pretreatment Program administers regulations to make sure the wastewater generated by industries is treated properly. Many industries must pretreat their wastewater before sending it to the sewer. This helps to protect the wastewater treatment system, our employees, the facilities as well as help to ensure that clean, quality water is discharged.  Because of our relationships with local industries and their commitment to protecting the environment, our waterways are cleaner today than in previous decades because business practices have improved.

Fats, Oil, and Grease Program:

In an effort to help protect the City of Elkhart’s sewer infrastructure, reduce blockages and backups, on April 6, 2015, the City of Elkhart’s Council adopted Ordinance No. 5434 to regulate the discharge of fats, oil, and grease (FOG) from food service establishments (FSEs).  This ordinance took effect on June 1, 2015.  The goal of this program is to help protect the City’s sewer infrastructure.  Passage of the ordinance is just one component of the City’s FOG program.  The City recognizes that FSEs are just one part of our customer base that may contribute to the buildup of FOG in the sewers. Other components of the program include the regulation of non-FSE industrial customers and outreach to local residents to reduce their contribution of FOG to the City’s sewer system.

A major component of the FOG Program is the registration of ALL FSE’s connected to the City of Elkhart’s sewer system.  Once registered and an inspection completed, FSE’s will receive a FOG Registration Certificate.  The FOG Registration Certificate will be valid for 3 years from the date of issuance.

On July 2, 2019, Elkhart’s City Council adopted changes to the FOG ordinance.  The changes to the Ordinance were the result of combined input from the Utility and with the local food service establishments.  These changes went into effect immediately will be referred to as Ordinance 5434 as amended.

Additionally, the City of Elkhart’s Board of Public Works approved changes to the FOG policy on July 16, 2019.

Thank you food service establishments for your continued efforts to eliminate fats, oil, and grease in our sewer system.

Dental Mercury:

Dental offices discharge mercury present in amalgam used for fillings. The Pretreatment Program is in the process of developing a dental mercury program.

Programs
& Services.

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.

City of Elkhart Tax Phase-in Program: The City of Elkhart recognizes the value in selective use of a Tax Phase-In. Under Indiana State statute, both personal and real property improvements can receive a tax phase-in of up to 10 years. The length of thephase-in is based upon several factors, including number of jobs created, wage levelsof new jobs and amount of overall investment.

Get the Tax Phase-in Application here (pdf)

Aurora Capital Loan Fund: The Aurora Capital Loan Fund will be used to finance therehabilitation and construction of commercial real estate in Downtown Elkhart. The objective of the loan fund is to stimulate physical improvements to small businessesin Downtown Elkhart.

Get the Aurora Capital Load Fund Application here (pdf)

For more information regarding the Aurora Capital Loan Fund, please contact its loan administrator – Mr. Burl Troyer at burltroyer@icloud.com

Trash
& Recycling.

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.

The Public Works and Utilities Department and the Street Department facilitate the collection of garbage and recycling efforts within the City of Elkhart.  Recycling carts and trash carts are distributed by Borden Waste-Away. They can be reached at 574-293-5001. Small recycling bins are distributed at the City Street Department located at 2421 S. 17th St.  They can be reached at 574-293-5518.

Curbside Recycling

Doing your part to recycle will help keep trash collection costs down and save room at our landfill. Once a week, on the same day as your trash collection, Borden Waste-Away also collects recyclables. As of January 1st, you have your choice or recycling container, two 18 gallon bins, a 48-gallon cart, or a 96-gallon cart. To obtain the 18-gallon bins please contact the Elkhart Street Department. Their telephone number is 293-5518 and their hours of operation are Monday through Friday 8 am to 4 pm. To obtain a 48 or 96-gallon cart please contact Borden. You may go to their website at www.wasteawaygroup.com and click Elkhart City Recycling Program. You may also call Borden (574) 293-5001, Monday – Friday 7 am – 5:30 pm & Saturday 8 am – 12 pm.
What Can You Recycle?
Glass Bottles and Jars
Clear, brown, or green glass bottles or jars (but not Pyrex, light bulbs, plate glass, drinking glasses, ceramics, auto glass, tempered glass, or mirrors)
1. Remove all lids and rinse
2. Labels and rings can be left on
3. Do not break
Metal
Clean aluminum, tin, and steel cans.  Please rinse before recycling.  Please do not include cans that have contained pesticides, herbicides, or paint. (Labels may be left on.)
Paper
Newspapers, magazines and catalogs, inserts, office, and copy paper, junk mail, paper bags, telephone books, computer paper, and other papers. Corrugated cardboard and paperboard boxes such as cereal boxes, shoe boxes, or beverage cartons. (Please keep any contaminated paper, soiled napkins, or carbon paper out of the recycling bin.)
 
Plastic’s # 1 thru 7
Examples include rinsed soft drink and water bottles, yogurt containers, milk jugs, detergent bottles, or frozen food containers. Please no expanded polystyrene, such as packing peanuts or popcorn.

Recycling numbers

A few things to keep in mind…
  1. Please only put the bin out on the same day as your regular trash pickup.
  2. If your collection day falls on a holiday, your waste and your recyclables will be picked up on the following day.
  3. Always, have your recyclables on your curbside by 6:00 am.
  4. When you move, leave the recycling bin for the next homeowner.

For more information please check out our City of Elkhart Recycling Brochure.

The 3 Rs?  Reduce, Reuse and Recycle
Every day we as consumers choose which items purchase items and how we dispose of our waste.  Remembering 3 R’s can help us be green buyers and ultimately help protect the earth for future generations.
Reduce
First, reduce the waste being generated.  Some ideas include purchasing and using durable instead of disposal items (such as dishes, shopping bags, shaving razors, etc). When purchasing items, look for minimum packaging and if it will generate waste after it is used, look for items that can be recycled. When items are reduced, no new resources are expended.
Reuse
Second, reuse the waste being generated. When one no longer needs an item but it still has a useful life, that item can be reused either in the manner in which it was initially intended or in a new way. For ideas on how to reuse, check out Keep Indianapolis Beautiful’s Reuse and Recycling Guide.
Recycle
Third, recycle the waste being generated. Recycling takes items no longer needed or useful and turns it into raw material for new product manufacturing. Glass, paper, plastic, and some metals can be turned into new products that contain recycled content, saving energy in the manufacturing, reducing pollution associated with the mining and extraction of raw materials, and conserving a natural resource.

Trash Pick-Up

Trash pick-up is provided by the City utilizing a one 96-gallon cart and is serviced weekly. For more information see below.

Proper placement of cart and pick-up.

  • On the day of service, carts must be out by 6:00 AM.  The holiday pick-up schedule is one day later than the regular schedule.
  • Cart placement must be within 3 feet of the curb or street side (front of the curb or behind the curb is acceptable).  The placement must be unobstructed, with 2 feet of clearance from objects such as parked cars, trees, poles, etc.
  • Alley pickup is no longer available.
  • Large item pickup – Residents must contact Borden Waste-Away at (574) 293-5001 to arrange for large-item pickup. Included: Furniture, carpet rolls, and large appliances. Not Included: Tires, electronics, construction material, or car parts.

-Residents may dispose of 2 large household items per month
-Residents may dispose of 1 item containing Freon per month
-Pickup for large items is done on the resident’s normal route day with at least 24-hour notice.

What to do when additional service is needed beyond the capacity of the 96-gallon cart:

  • Additional carts are available through Borden.
  • Bag and container tags are available at area Martin’s Supermarkets and the office of Borden Waste-Away.
  • Container tags can be used for any approved residential trash can, waste cart, and for Christmas tree disposal.
  • Bag tags can be used for any household trash bag.
  • For other additional service needs, residents are to call Borden Waste-Away at 293-5001.

To view a map of the Residential Trash Pick-Up Boundaries**

**This trash and recycling service schedule does not apply to non-residential entities, residential dwellings over 4 units, or mobile home communities. There may be additional exceptions.  Please contact Borden at (574) 293-5001 if you have any questions about which day your trash and recycling is scheduled to be serviced.

VIEW MAP


Household Hazardous Waste

Leftover household products that contain corrosive, toxic, or reactive ingredients are considered to be “household hazardous waste” (HHW). HHW includes products such as paints, cleaners, oils, batteries, unused or expired medications, pesticides, or other items that contain potentially hazardous ingredients. These products are safe to use when you follow the manufacturer’s instructions, but they require special handling when you are ready to dispose of them. If disposed of improperly, these wastes can pollute the environment and they can pose a threat to human health. HHW should not be poured down the drain, on the ground, or into storm sewers.

What to Do With HHW
Any household hazardous waste should be saved and brought to one of the monthly Household Hazardous Waste Drop-off Days sponsored by the Elkhart County Solid Waste Management District (all Elkhart County residents are welcomed to drop off waste).  HHW Drop-off Days are held on the first Saturdays of every month from 8am to 3pm at the Elkhart County Correctional Facility on County Road 7 just north of County Road 26. For more information about HHW Drop-off Days please call the Solid Waste Management District at (574) 522-2581.

Items accepted at the monthly HHW Drop-off Days:

  • Floor care products, furniture polish, metal polish
  • Nail polish and polish remover
  • Antifreeze, brake fluid, gasoline, kerosene, transmission fluid, windshield washer fluid, used motor oil
  • Glue, mineral spirits, oil based paint, aerosol paints, paint thinner, paint stripper, rust remover, varnish, wood preservative
  • Fungicide, insecticide, weed killer, rat/mouse poison
  • Household cleaners, gun cleaning solvent, moth balls, lighter fluid, swimming pool chemicals
  • Unused or expired medications (you may also drop off any sharps but they must be in a puncture proof container)
  • Mercury (see link for more information about mercury and our environment)
  • Compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFL’s)
  • Rechargeable batteries, lithium batteries, car batteries (SWMD will take car batteries but these may also be sold to a local scrap dealer)

Items NOT accepted at the monthly HHW Drop-off Days:

Batteries: 
Alkaline batteries can be disposed of in the trash.

Electronic Waste: 
Borden will be hosting a quarterly electronics drop off for all City residents located at 605 Mason St. starting in 2019. The dates of the drop off events will be:

March 25th, 2019
June 27th, 2019
Sept. 26th, 2019
Dec. 19th, 2019

Other options for disposal of electronics :
Best Buy
Borden’s Waste Away
Computer Recycling, Inc (no TV’s)
Goodwill (computers only)
Omni Source (574) 295-4657
Staples

Latex Paint:
Absorb paint with shredded newspaper, kitty litter, sand, sawdust, or other absorbents, and dispose of in your trash. Aerosol cans can be emptied of their contents and disposed of in the trash. Oil-based paint may be taken to the HHW drop-off.

Medications:
Medications may be dropped off at any Elkhart County police station lobby 365 days a year. You may also drop off any sharps (needles, syringes, scalpels, etc.) during an HHW Drop-off Day but they must be in a puncture-proof container.  Please DO NOT dispose of medications in any form in the trash or down the drain!

Microwaves:
Omnisource (574) 295-4657
Sam Winers & Co (574) 293-9031
Schupan & Sons (574) 524-2100

Refrigerators & Freezers:
I & M (call 800-253-5661 for pick up)
Omnisource (574) 295-4657

Tires:
Return to a store that sells tires.

Styrofoam:

Quarterly drop-off available at Recycling Works for City Residents located at 605 Mason Street in Elkhart
Dates: March 25th, 2019
June 27th, 2019
Sept. 26th, 2019
Dec. 19th, 2019


Stormwater.

.

What is Stormwater?
Stormwater is water from snow and ice melting, as well as rainwater from storms. When stormwater lands on natural surfaces like forests and grassy areas, most of it soaks into the ground. When it lands on streets, parking lots, and other hard surfaces, it usually runs off to another location.

What is Stormwater Pollution?
As stormwater flows (or snow melts), it picks up debris, chemicals (such as fertilizers and pesticides), dirt, cigarette butts, and other pollutants. This “contaminated” water then enters a storm sewer system and is eventually discharged to a lake, stream, river, wetland, or pond.

Why is Stormwater Pollution a concern?
Within Elkhart stormwater may run off of driveways, parking lots, construction sites, and streets where it picks up oil, grease, sediments, and many other pollutants that are harmful to the environment. As this stormwater washes down our streets it flows into storm drains and then directly into local ponds, creeks, and rivers. When this stormwater flow becomes polluted with eroded soils, automotive fluids, trash, and lawn chemicals, it affects our ability to use our water bodies for drinking, fishing, and recreational purposes. It also degrades aquatic habitats that are essential for waterfowl, fish, and other aquatic organisms. The only way to decrease this polluted stormwater runoff is to reduce the number of pollutants in our urban environment.

Why does Elkhart need a Stormwater Utility?
The City of Elkhart has many natural waterways that wind through the community. Walking/jogging paths and numerous city parks are adjacent to these waterways and provide recreational opportunities for anglers, kayakers, and canoeists. Discharges from various facilities located along the banks of these waterways have been disconnected or cleaned up over the years in an effort to keep unwanted pollution from finding its way into these flowing waters. These efforts have improved the water quality in these waterways but there is still one common way for pollution to get carried into our rivers and streams: through stormwater runoff. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) now considers pollution contained in stormwater runoff to be one of the most significant sources of contamination in our nation’s waterways. To help reduce stormwater pollution, in 1990 EPA established rules to ensure that larger cities create programs, policies and rules at the local level to minimize stormwater pollution. In the late 1990s, these EPA stormwater rules were applied nationwide to municipalities like ours and other densely populated areas.

Who Manages the Stormwater?
The City of Elkhart’s Stormwater Utility was created in 2006 and has responsibility for operating, maintaining, and improving an extensive system of open waterways and enclosed storm sewer pipes. This system contains more than 80 miles of sewer pipes, ditches, and open channels that drain more than 24 square miles. This system exists to collect the stormwater that runs off yards, roofs, streets, and parking lots and carry it away from neighborhoods to local waterways or retention ponds.

The Utility must also ensure that Elkhart meets state and federal requirements for improving the quality of stormwater runoff. Because most stormwater receives no treatment before it goes into a stream, lake, or river it is important that we keep as many pollutants as possible out of the stormwater runoff.

How is Stormwater Management Paid For?
The services of the Stormwater Utility are paid for by a semi-annual fee added to property tax bills. All residential parcels pay $15.00 per year to support the system and non-residential parcels pay $15.00 per 3,600 square feet of impervious land (land with a hard surface that won’t absorb stormwater such as driveways, rooftops, and sidewalks). The City’s authority for collecting this fee is found in Ordinances 5012 (2/9/2007), 5246 (1/28/2011), and 5319 (11/26/2012).


Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP)
Disturbance of 1-acre or more of non-agricultural land requires the property owner to develop a SWPPP and permit the land-disturbing activities. Guidance and forms associated with Elkhart County Soil and Water Conservation District’s (SWCD) plan review process can be found on the Elkhart County Stormwater Partnership’s website or by clicking here.

Wastewater.

.

.

The Elkhart Wastewater Treatment Plant is located at 1201 South Nappanee Street in Elkhart, Indiana and discharges effluent to the St. Joseph River under the authority of the Indiana Department of Environmental Management through the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) with permit #IN0025674.
The facility utilizes the conventional activated sludge process and is designed to treat an average daily flow of 20 MGD with a peak flow capacity of 40 MGD. Preliminary treatment includes automatic bar screens and cyclone grit removal, primary treatment includes eight rectangular clarifiers, and secondary treatment includes five aeration tanks, utilizing a biological nutrient removal process for ammonia and phosphorus. Effluent from the facility is disinfected year-round with ultraviolet light.
Sludge produced as a part of treating the wastewater is processed utilizing anaerobic treatment,  to reduce solids and achieve pathogen reduction. Class A biosolids are dewatered using two-meter belt filter presses and are either given away under an IDEM issued Marketing & Distribution permit, INLA 000680, or processed at a composting facility on County Road 26.

Public
Outreach.

.

.

City of Elkhart Tax Phase-in Program: The City of Elkhart recognizes the value in selective use of a Tax Phase-In. Under Indiana State statute, both personal and real property improvements can receive a tax phase-in of up to 10 years. The length of thephase-in is based upon several factors, including number of jobs created, wage levelsof new jobs and amount of overall investment.

Get the Tax Phase-in Application here (pdf)

Aurora Capital Loan Fund: The Aurora Capital Loan Fund will be used to finance therehabilitation and construction of commercial real estate in Downtown Elkhart. The objective of the loan fund is to stimulate physical improvements to small businessesin Downtown Elkhart.

Get the Aurora Capital Load Fund Application here (pdf)

For more information regarding the Aurora Capital Loan Fund, please contact its loan administrator – Mr. Burl Troyer at burltroyer@icloud.com